Intellectual Property Resource Center

Intellectual Property Resource Center

Intellectual property refers to inventions, designs, literary works, names, symbols, artistic works or any such creative work produced by an individual or group. These can be further classified into copyright which cover artistic and literary works and industrial property which covers inventions, trademarks, industrial designs, and so on.

Copyright

Intellectual property refers to inventions, designs, literary works, names, symbols, artistic works or any such creative work produced by an individual or group. These can be further classified into copyright which cover artistic and literary works and industrial property which covers inventions, trademarks, industrial designs, and so on.

Copyright

A copyright is the right granted to an individual or group that prevents their work from being copied, distributed or adapted. Copyright covers art, literary works like novels, books, poems, music, and movies. Even translations and adaptations need to get the approval from the artist before being carried out. Prior approval is required if more copies of the work are to be made. The work has to be registered and the copyright symbol should be displayed. The copyright lasts for seventy years after the creator has died though there may be exceptions in certain cases.

  • Copyright: The official site of the US Copyright Office.
  • Copyrights: The page provides information on the policy of the Library of Congress on copyright issues.
  • Copyright Tutorial: Take this crash course to learn all about copyrights.
  • Copyright Issues: The page offers resources covering copyright, licensing issues, and intellectual property rights.
  • About Copyright: Virginia Tech provides information on copyright and some myths about copyright.
  • FAQs: Stanford University offers answers to some of the frequently asked questions about copyright.
  • Quick Guide: Take this guide by Columbia University to quickly learn about copyright laws.
  • Copyright Policy & Guideline: The page explains some general copyright policies and guidelines.
  • Copyright Education: The University of California Community provides an education center for everybody who wants to learn more about copyright.
  • Copyrighting Your Work: The University of Colorado shows how you can copyright your work.

Trademark

A trademark is used to distinguish a particular product or service as being from an original and unique source, belonging to a certain individual or organization. It comprises of a combination of name, logo, design, symbol, phrase or a word or any of these individually. A trademark is represented by TM if it is unregistered, SM if it is a trademark for an unregistered service, and R inside a circle for a registered trademark. It’s used to prevent others from using a similar trademark so that consumers do not get confused though similar goods or services under a different trademark can be sold. A trademark is to be registered at the Patent and Trademark Office.

  • Trademarks Home: The official site of the US Patent & Trademark Office with all information on trademarks.
  • Trademark: The Cornell University Law School provides a definition and overview of trademarks.
  • Current Legal Literature: Come here to access current legal literature on trademarks.
  • Trademark Search: Follow this step-by-step tutorial to perform a trademark search.
  • Trademark & Brand: The article explores the relationship between trademark and brand.
  • Patent & Trademark: The University of Maryland provides some information on patents and trademarks.
  • State Trademarks: The site provides information on trademark laws in all the states.
  • Application Form: Use this form to apply for a trademark in New York.
  • Trademark & Internet: The research focuses on trademark and the Internet’s first-sale doctrine.
  • Trademark Grammar: The page provides essential information on the usage of grammar in trademarks.

Patent

Issued by the Patent and Trademark Office, a patent grants the right of a particular property to its inventor. There are three types of patents, namely, design patents, plant patents, and utility patents. Utility patens are given to the inventors of a new process, machine, any manufacturing article or any new or useful improvements. Design patents are awarded for the invention of new and original designs in manufacturing. Plant patents are given for discovering or creating a new variety of plant. These patents last for twenty years from the date when it was applied.

  • Patents: The official site of the US Patent and Trademark Office with all information on patents.
  • Genetics & Patenting: The site provides information on patenting in the area of genetics.
  • FAQs: The page provides answers to frequently asked questions about patents.
  • Patent Search: Learn how to search for a patent on the Internet.
  • 150 Years of Patent Protection: The paper by Josh Lerner probes into the use of patents in developed countries.
  • Patent Reform: The article by Wendy H. Schacht looks at the possibility of reforms in the biomedical and software industries.
  • Glossary: A good place to learn patent terms.
  • Bayh-Dole Act: Go through these FAQs to learn more about this act.
  • Patent Oppositions: The paper looks into the issues of patent opposition.
  • Uniformity Principle: The paper offers a response to the uniformity principle of patents.

Industrial Design Rights

Industrial design rights protect the visual designs of products without any utility. It could be a shape, composition of colors or a combination of shapes and colors. This industrial design could be two or three dimensional. It can be used to create a product, commodity or a handicraft. The industrial design rights help to safeguard the aesthetic appeal of the article that the design is used for. An application should be filed with the WIPO and the design will be protected in the nations covered under the treaty. For industrial protection rights in other countries, the respective procedures should be followed.

  • Industrial Designs: The page provides information on industrial design rights.
  • Industrial Design: The site offers comprehensive information on industrial designs.
  • Safeguarding the Rights: The Bureau of Intellectual Property Netherlands Antilles explains about industrial design protection.
  • IDSA: The official site of the Industrial Designers Society of America.
  • About Industrial Designs: The World Intellectual Property Organization provides vital information on industrial designs.

Trade Secret:

Any confidential or classified information that provides a business with a competitive edge over the others is called a trade secret. This could be manufacturing, commercial or industrial secrets in the form of a practice, formula, pattern or design. Companies can protect the information by entering into non disclosure contracts with its employees and even the vendors. According to the Trade Related Aspects of Intellectual Property Rights, for any information to be considered trade secret, it must be of economic value and there must be efforts to maintain its secrecy.

  • European Union: The US Commercial Service provides information on trade secrets protection in the EU.
  • Trade Secret: The page offers a definition of trade secrets.
  • Uniform Trade Secrets Act: A place to read the uniform trade secrets act.
  • FAQs: The page provides answers to frequently asked questions about trade secrets.
  • Trade Secrets: Come here to learn more about trade secrets.

Intellectual property protection is a big issue in the world. It’s important to note that all countries have different laws and regulation regarding intellectual property protection.

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